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Most Noticeable Concrete Hero

Decorative concrete, also known as architectural concrete, can be described as any technique that transforms simple, grey concrete into something more aesthetically pleasing. Many different looks and techniques are possible for decorative concrete. Acid stains, acrylic stains, concrete dyes, and integral colours are examples of basic colouring techniques (also called integrated colors; mixed into the concrete before it is poured). Stamping, scoring, chiselling, and polishing are examples of special treatments that can alter the texture of the surface. Decorative concrete also incorporates various techniques to fully customise the slab. If you’re looking for more tips, Concrete Hero has it for you.

Staining is probably one of the most well-known methods for making plain concrete more design-friendly, especially for interior applications. This method entails essentially staining a cured concrete slab to make it a different colour (or colors). Concrete stains are divided into two categories. Acid stains are the most common type of concrete stain. It is well-known for its ability to create vivid colour. The acid reacts with the concrete and begins to live on its own. As a consequence, the paint is marbleized, resembling grainy leather. It’s probably one of the most difficult stains to work with because you’re dealing with acid after all.

This stain does not conceal concrete flaws. On the opposite, it would almost certainly reveal flaws that you didn’t see before when the concrete was in its natural state. However, the character shown by the acid stain is part of the allure of an acid stain job’s finished product. Acid stains produce a much more uneven appearance than water-based and acrylic concrete stains. These stains have a thin, milky consistency that helps them to seep into the pores of the concrete, separating them from concrete paints, which can flake off because they merely cover the surface. Since the stain and the concrete do not react chemically, it acts more like a dye.